Category Archives: Sustainable Seafood

Why Salmon can’t be on the menu anymore

We as consumers, particularly in western countries, are pretty boring when it comes to our seafood. Given the diversity of fish in our oceans this seems pretty strange. It’s like our taste buds are only fond of a handful of species such as tuna, cod, salmon, flake etc. But our obsession for these fish (majority of which are apex predators), has resulted in many of their stocks becoming overfished and deterioration of the ecosystems in which they live in. So it’s time we started mixing things up in terms of what seafood we catch, order, buy and cook!! This leads me to today’s guest post by Lauren Yates of Ponytail Journal. Lauren runs a super successfully blog covering all things from fashion, food and travel. When it comes to cooking, Lauren is a huge advocate of using sustainable seafood, regularly encouraging her followers to steer clear of the ‘trendy’ species that are overexploited and explore more sustainable options. Read her post below on why salmon can’t be on the menu anymore… Continue reading

Rock fishing for Luderick

One of my all-time favourite styles of fishing is targeting Luderick (Girella tricuspidata) off wave exposed rock ledges with a float, centre-pin reel and a handful of seaweed. A couple of weekends ago, Niko, Gus and I went exploring in the Royal National Park just south of Sydney to find an empty rock platform and some hungry Luderick. Gus being the super talented videographer that he is filmed the action and produced a short video that captures, what I think Luderick fishing is all about (watch below in HD if possible 🙂 ).

Continue reading

Positive response of Giant Mud Crabs to protected areas

The giant mud crab (Scylla serrata) is a beast of a crustacean, capable of reaching 3kg in weight but often caught around the 0.5-1kg range. In Australia, they are distributed in sheltered waters from southern NSW, up through QLD, across the NT and over to Broome, WA.

Giant mud crabs have a short life cycle (3-4 years) and are reproductive machines. Females can carry between 2 – 5 million eggs and migrate up to 95km offshore to release their eggs. The young crabs hatch as tiny planktonic larvae, where they can remain in this stage for several weeks at the mercy of ocean currents. This aspect of their biology gives giant mud crabs substantial capabilities for dispersal.

A giant mud crab (Scylla serrata) chillin next to some mangroves on Mali Island. Photo by Jürgen Freund. Check out more of his amazing wildlife photos here and on facebook at Jurgen Freund Photography – Australia.

Their prized meat and high numbers within estuaries make them a highly targeted recreationally and commercially harvested species. In NSW, annual commercial landings are approximately 100-120t and the annual recreational catch is estimated between 30-60t. The main method of capture by both commercial and recreational fishers are crab pots, however rec fishers also use hoop nets or dillies.

Continue reading