Tag Archives: Fishing

Vote 1 in FlyLife Photo Comp

Voting is now open for the Fly Life Magazine‘s photo competition and all of the finalists have some cracking entries.

Big congrats to our mate Angus Kennedy for reaching the finals with his shot of Matt guiding his canoe down the rapids of a remote south coast Bass stream. Continue reading

My last fish of the year…

The plan was to head to the mid stretches of the Thredbo River in the Snowy Mountains to try and fool some foot-long brown trout into eating a dry fly. But after a short walk to my favourite stretch of water the rain had set in making it almost impossible to spot my fly. A change in tactics was needed, so I tied on a heavy double nymph rig and attached a subtle indicator to fish some deeper runs.

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Dry fly fishing the Snowy Mountains

Warm afternoons, insects hatching and brown trout looking to the surface for a feed – A couple of weekends ago my old man and I had a great weekend fly fishing the Snowy Mountains region. After mid-week snow and rain the creeks were running well and the trout eager for well-presented dry flies. Below are a handful of images from the trip…

By Matt Rees
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Fishing Journal now online

It’s probably no real surprise that both Lac and I do a fair bit of fishing (some say too much). In the past we’ve documented what we’ve been catching on Instagram, but are often left with pictures from our fishing trips which end up clogging our hard drives. So this year we have created a “Fishing Journal” page on the blog to share some thoughts and pictures from our fishing adventures. Continue reading

The global tracking map: your key to discovering how the marine world moves.

VEMCO researchers map

VEMCOs researchers map: ‘Help us help you collaborate with the best researchers in the world and let us “Put You on the Map”! Red pins represent studies using VEMCO products, the dark pins represent institutes’.

For those that have an interest in animal movement in the oceans, I’d like to draw your attention to a handy and interesting tool on the VEMCO website; the global tracking map. This tool Continue reading

Positive response of Giant Mud Crabs to protected areas

The giant mud crab (Scylla serrata) is a beast of a crustacean, capable of reaching 3kg in weight but often caught around the 0.5-1kg range. In Australia, they are distributed in sheltered waters from southern NSW, up through QLD, across the NT and over to Broome, WA.

Giant mud crabs have a short life cycle (3-4 years) and are reproductive machines. Females can carry between 2 – 5 million eggs and migrate up to 95km offshore to release their eggs. The young crabs hatch as tiny planktonic larvae, where they can remain in this stage for several weeks at the mercy of ocean currents. This aspect of their biology gives giant mud crabs substantial capabilities for dispersal.

A giant mud crab (Scylla serrata) chillin next to some mangroves on Mali Island. Photo by Jürgen Freund. Check out more of his amazing wildlife photos here and on facebook at Jurgen Freund Photography – Australia.

Their prized meat and high numbers within estuaries make them a highly targeted recreationally and commercially harvested species. In NSW, annual commercial landings are approximately 100-120t and the annual recreational catch is estimated between 30-60t. The main method of capture by both commercial and recreational fishers are crab pots, however rec fishers also use hoop nets or dillies.

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Defining geographic boundaries for shark populations

by Dr Pascal T Geraghty

Declining fish stocks and increasing fishing capability worldwide have placed an ever growing emphasis on the need for responsible fishery and species management at appropriate spatial scales. To achieve this, delineating the discrete breeding groups (or populations) of a target species within a given geographical area is of utmost importance. This is particularly challenging in the marine realm, however, where population boundaries are dictated by cryptic barriers to dispersal, a species’ potential for travel and reproductive behavioural traits. Nevertheless, genetic techniques have become an invaluable tool for uncovering population structure in exploited marine creatures.

fishingimage

Demersal longline shark fishing in northern NSW waters as observed during 2008/09. Photo: Dr Geraghty.

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