Tag Archives: marine science

Species on the move

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A prediction of the preferred environmental habitat for the range-shifting yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) for March 2008, based on a combination of preferences for sea surface temperature, current speed and sea surface height.

Curtis Champion is a PhD candidate at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies – University of Tasmania. He stopped by the Fish Thinkers blog to give us a run down on some of the research he is working on.

Species on the move and a quick explainer about how range-shifts are commonly identified

Climate. Change. No doubt you’ve heard of the phenomenon. And while a small number of our political reps sporadically break into the headlines for criticising its reality, the global scientific community has been busy forging novel territory to understand its ecological consequences. This emergent field is most-commonly referred to as “species redistribution science” because plants and animals shifting where they live (generally towards the poles or up mountains) in response to changes in temperature is perhaps the most perceptible ecological effect of climate change. Continue reading

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The Stand: Why are we scared to go in the water?

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“The chances of falling victim to a shark attack are incredibly slim, yet these majestic creatures represent one of mankind’s greatest fears. In a world where every shark encounter is front page news, can we fight back against this distorted perception?”

Continue reading

Tagging along with the Coastal Carolina University Shark team

 

Caroline (from over at CCU Shark Research Team) stopped by the Fish Thinkers blog to give us a run down on where her research is headed and a sneak peak into the world of grad student shark research in the United States. Continue reading

Fish Thinkers online: 2015 in review

 

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Photo credit: Top centre Aussie Fly fisher, top right John Harding & all others Fish Thinkers.

I was reading one of the bigger ecology blogs that I find myself returning to fairly regularly and they posted a review of their blog year, mostly for themselves to reference.  I found it interesting so went to have a look at our own blog and social media stats. I thought  I’d post a fish thinkers summary mainly as a record for myself but also on the odd chance anyone else is vaguely interested (its also a sneaky way to kick off a year in which I plan to post on here more regularly). Continue reading

Dragging the chain – does anchoring by large ships impact our marine life?

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be joining a multidisciplinary team of researchers, supported by UOW’s Global Challenges program, to investigate the potential impact of large ships anchoring on our marine life and seafloor habitats.

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As an island nation, we are heavily dependent on shipping, with large ships transporting 99% of our trade by volume. Prior to entering our ports these large vessels may anchor in deep water, often for many days, waiting for their turn to exchange cargo.

Now when I say ‘large’ I mean freakin huge (see pic below). These ships are between 200-300 metres long and to anchor they require an anchor chain up to 250 metres long where each individual chain link can weigh up to 200 kilograms! Continue reading

The global tracking map: your key to discovering how the marine world moves.

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VEMCOs researchers map: ‘Help us help you collaborate with the best researchers in the world and let us “Put You on the Map”! Red pins represent studies using VEMCO products, the dark pins represent institutes’.

For those that have an interest in animal movement in the oceans, I’d like to draw your attention to a handy and interesting tool on the VEMCO website; the global tracking map. This tool Continue reading

Special underwater video session – ASFB conference

I’m very excited to be co-convening a special session on the use of video technology to better understand fish ecology and behaviour at the Australian Society of Fish Biology conference 2015!! See flyer below for details. Registration and abstract submission ARE NOW OPEN!!

Also check out ASFB’s Facebook page here for regular updates.

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